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NEWS

Giving Technical Impetus To Our Education

DELTA State Governor, Senator (Dr) Ifeanyi Okowa’s recent creation of the Ministry of Technical Education has brought to three, the number of ministries handling education which, unarguably, is the single biggest industry in the state. The decision is ostensibly aimed at accelerating the tempo of the development of the state.

We are delighted with the development, given its potential of creating a pool of skilled youths who would not only contribute qualitatively to the development of the state but also favorably compete with their counterparts within Nigeria and beyond.

No doubt, the initiative in this direction is driven by the necessity of prioritizing the existence of technical education, which, on account of the prolonged neglect, has created a shortage in the number of artisans in the state and increased the incidence of unemployment. Not only has the scourge of unemployment impoverished the lives of the affected category, but it has also compounded social vices such as armed robbery, kidnapping, and prostitution.

Thus, with the coming of the Ministry of Technical Education, a lot of benefits await Delta State and its people. Apart from providing opportunity for effective and viable livelihood for those not gifted in other types of education, it holds the promise of creating a pool of competent youths who would leverage on the acquired skills to render vital services in the society, and also walk the path of self-employment which, with the passage of time, will reduce youth unemployment, which impairs national security and well being.

The move by the administration is a well-thought-out initiative to further its commitment towards growing technical education in the state. It is aimed at consolidating the huge gains already made by the Okowa government which established the Delta State Board for Technical and Vocational Education and assigned it responsibility for the running and management of technical and vocational education in the state.

The government had in an unprecedented move, subsequently rehabilitated the six public technical colleges at Agbor, Kwale, Ofagbe, Otor-Ogor, Sapele and Issele-Uku, a development that provided an impetus for the schools to deliver on their mandate. Of course, it is a thing of joy that they have since earned the accreditation of both the National Board for Technical Education (NBTE) and the National Board for Business and Technical Education (NABTEB) for their programs as well as enhanced student enrollment within the intervening period.

Quite fortunately, the creation of the ministry was accompanied by the administration’s proposal to establish 19 more technical colleges in the local government areas, which is without any doubt, a deliberate measure to democratize such prized institutions across the state.

Indeed, the two aforementioned initiatives represent a novel step that only a creatively-inclined administration could have conceived to deliver on its vision. A great measure of political will is required, in view of the envisaged huge logistic and financial implication.

Without any shred of doubt, both the operationalization of the ministry and the establishment of the proposed colleges would not be a walk in the park. Great sacrifices and missionary zeal are required for success in both directions. This is the reason we appeal to all stakeholders to work in concert to ensure the delivery of these golden dreams. No sacrifice is too much to make in pursuit of these noble goals.

copyright Pointer Newspapers

Categories
REVIEW WORLD

Review: 4 rugged tablets put to the test

Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.

Categories
REVIEW SPORTS

Battle over mobile payments is raging

Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.

Categories
SCIENCE SPORTS

Higher rates lead to mortgage drop

Britons are normally never more comfortable than when talking about the weather, but recent extreme weather events have began to test that theory. Since December, the United Kingdom has faced a relentless assault from some of the worst winter weather on record. It began with the worst storm and tidal surges in 60 years hitting the North Sea coastline, floods that ruined Christmas for thousands across Surrey and Dorset and in January, the most exceptional period of rainfall since 1766. The deluge has transformed swathes of southern England into cold, dark lakes, destroying homes and businesses.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents for doing little more than turning up as “flood tourists” at the site of disasters, incapable of helping those in crisis and only there for a photo opportunity. The Environment Agency, the body responsible for combating floods and managing rivers, has also been blamed for failing to curb the disasters. But there’s an ever larger debate over the role of climate change in the current floods and storms, and it has been unremittingly hostile.

Politicians have looked weak in the face of such natural disaster, with many facing criticism from local residents.— Julia Slingo, ETF

For those affected by flooding however, their immediate concerns are not necessarily about the manmade changes to the earth’s atmosphere. A YouGov poll from February found that while 84% of those surveyed believed Britain was likely to experience similar extreme weather events in the next few years, only 30% thought it was connected to man-made climate change. Politicians have looked weak in the face of such disaster.

There is no evidence to counter the basic premise that a warmer world will lead to more intense daily and hourly rain events. When heavy rain in 2000 devastated parts of Britain, a later study found the climate change had doubled the chances of the flood occurring, said Julia Slingo.